Saturday, February 8, 2020

Tweet Scoop: Frankie Pangilinan Shares Spoken Language Dilemma






Images courtesy of Twitter: kakiep83

94 comments:

  1. Medyo nahilo ako sa sentence niya. Pakiexplain naman please. Salamat.

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    1. Rich Kid problem Schooled in High costly educational system.

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    2. Millennial problems, di marunong ng punctuations.

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    3. Diba lumaki syang inglesera? Didn't know it was an issue with her. Nagtaka lang ako, 20 na ako nung dumating ako sa US (and I've been here for 20 years na rin), but everyone says wala akong accent, and no mixing of words. Akala nila lumaki ako sa US. Pero lumaki ako sa Pinas watching American movies (HBO movies). Yun lang ang influence ko noon. Maybe, somehow that helped me.

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    4. 2:23, hindi pagu-English niya ang issue niya kundi Filipino accent.

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    5. kaartehan na lang, daming rich kid na mas matagal pang nanirahan sa US or UK pero ang tatas managalog and even the accent, perfect. mga kamaganak ko tumanda na sa US pero ang accent ganun na ganun pa din. siya dito lumaki at ilang buwan pa lang sa US.

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    6. 2:23 bakit ako araw araw naman ako nanunood ng hbo di pa rin maganda english ko.

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    7. Humblebrag spotted 2:23

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    8. 1254 When she speaks fluent English she has a Filipino accent. Conscious daw sya coz she studies in the USA. If she speaks in Filipino, she can't coz she's Taglish. Laki ng problema nya diba?

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    9. 1:38 millenial ba kamo? baka gen Z!

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    10. For Frankie (as I do not have Twitter or Insta):

      Correct grammar is more important than any accent.

      If you have the grammar down pat, you’ll be fine. Don’t put too much stock in getting the accent “right,” as getting your point across properly—correctly—is what you want when you are communicating with others. An accent is like an accessory, it’s good to have a “good” one that is universally understood but not necessarily important in the greater scheme of things. In general, correct grammar; coherence; and the tone or tenor or your speech (in verbal or written form) are the elements of effective communication. So, take it easy, breathe. Overtime, with much practice, I trust that you will become as eloquent a speaker as your father, both in Filipino and English.

      Thanks for passing my message on FP.

      ~ Tita from San Francisco, CA 🙂

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    11. Hindi humblebrag si 2:23. Karamihan naman nun sa Pinoys neutral accent kaya pagdating sa US nakapag adjust agad. Pansin ko kaso nauso pagiging coño ngayon, yung very hardcore into the slang at pagtaglish pero pag tinignan mo grammar sa Filipino at English sablay

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    12. 2:23 totoo ba? baka naman ayaw lang nila sabihin sa yo ang totoo LOL

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    13. @1203, pareho tayo ng naisip

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    14. We still have an accent. Iba iba lang. May strong, may hindi mashado matigas, pero compared sa Americans, meron tayong noticeable accent.

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    15. 2:23 the fact you’ve been in the US for 20 years and did not understand the context of her tweet, says a lot about your comprehension. So I can’t really say I believe you with having an accent, baka nga di lang nila masabi sayo. Haha. Just so you know her issue is that she can’t speak Filipino fluently. Hindi issue ung pagiging englishera nya, more on her being conyo having filipino accent.

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    16. Malinaw naman sinabi nya - she can’t speak in english without an accent PLUS a handful of filipino words.

      So taglish.

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  2. Normal for bilinguals and multilinguals to switch between languages. I know someone who speaks 4 languages and he sometimes says a sentence in a wild mix of those. Lol.

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  3. You’re in a literature class so what do you expect?

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  4. Ok lang yan! Buti nga di napapagpalit accent eh! That happens to me a lot as I speak three different languages so minsan nawawala sa loob ko kung sino kausap ko ang ending minsan correct language pero wrong accent.

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  5. Problema na natin ang fluency. Plus mga batang English na ang mother tongue kahit dito sa Pinas lumaki.

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  6. ang ingay ng batang to.. konti problema dami kuda..

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    1. It’s Twitter. Hello? Pag iingay talaga purpose ng Twitter. Tweet tweet tweet. It’s her thoughts. Wag ka mambasag trip.

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    2. I blocked her on twitter kasi self righteous ang dating. Dito ko lang nababasa.

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    3. asa if nag mamatter kay frankie un pag block mo s knya lol

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    4. Blocked talaga hahaha baka hindi mo lang finafollow. As if naman ginugulo ka nya need mo sya talaga iblock hahaha

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    5. Pansin ko din yan

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    6. 1:41 I get the same vibe from her! Ewan ko ba. Yung ibang mga anak ng showbiz parents di naman ganyan. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t hate her, I just don’t like the vibe or the tone of her tweets. But anyway, heto nga nakita ko na naman dito hahaha basta kasi sa FP lahat binabasa ko eh hahaha shunga din ako minsan

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    7. If you block her, hindi mo makikita ang tweets niya kahit na sinasagot o nila-like siya ng finafollow mo.

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    8. She seems to sweat the small stuff; and sounding negative at times. Can't she find something to be grateful about...

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  7. It’s called code switching, and it’s normal. Usually happens when someone is multilingual. Don’t be harsh on her. It happens to the best of us.

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    1. I agree. Especially if you’re with a large group of people who speak different languages and you’re all conversing with each other. Unavoidable mag code switch.

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    2. She’s bilingual

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    3. Syempre sa umpisa Filipino accent. Ako slowly nag improve kasi puro American ang kausap ko sa work. Maarte lang yan.

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    4. Ok, 5:00 am. Let me add bilingual to that sentence then. Code switching is normal and is usually done by bilinguals and multilinguals.

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  8. I feel her. I was raised in the Philippines until the age of 14 then I moved to Italy to be with my family. Now I speak Tagalog with Dad, Italian with boyfriend. A few months ago i started school in the US so yeah, I sometimes have issues with words since I make literal translation from Italian to English

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  9. We know dear, you have a different reality, so it will really make you feel nervous. You do not have post it as if you're an OFW trying to hustle to get by in life. Para kasing pa simple ka lang sa pag higlight na elite ka kaya hirap ka sa wikang Filipino at sanay ka lang dun pag pribadong konteksto.

    Kaya turo sa amin huwag mag taglish at wag conyotic.

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    1. Mismo, bigat ng problema eh.

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    2. korek!laki ng problema sa mundo,isipin mo ang mga ofw nakaka-survived sa non tagalog speaking countries sya pa kaya na ang problema ay accent lang,sla nmang judgy sa us kc maski ang tatagal na dito may accent pa din maski taga ibang countries coz sa haus nila native tongue ang gamit.get ka ng public speaking lesson din,afford mo yan

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    3. Actually the difference is, for OFWs you wouldn’t judge them for being barok but for kakie you would because you considered her as an elite. Just like what you did in your comment. :)

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    4. Ang bibitter nyo ah. Twitter nya yan. Kung pang mayaman ang problema nya, at pang mahirap ang problema nyo..wag kayo mainggit or magsalita ng masama kasi kanya kanya yan

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    5. She should mind more her writing before her accent

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    6. 8:44 haha no one is judging anyone about accent or usage of the english and filipino language. i expressed understanding her situation, i hope you noticed. you will discover that there are tons of accent and it does not really matter. lasty, kindly learn how to use the word 'actually'. :)

      8:44 and 9:11 you probably do not know that it's innate for 'some' rich people to be highly creative in imposing to other's their preconceive ability and status. :)

      i am not bitter so please chill and smile :)

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  10. Yan ang problema kapag nakasanayan mo ang Taglish

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    1. Just like her mom who to this day at age 54 still talks Taglish like a colegiala in her teens. She's so used to it she can't change the way she speaks.

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  11. Nag-uumpisa pa lang andami ng reklamo. Pano pa kung nasa real world kana?

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  12. Miss Frankie kalma lang po tayo ano ho

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    1. I think she's overwhelmed that she's in a foreign land for uni where the students are not as sheltered as they are here.

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  13. Happened to me when I went to Cebu, I kept uttering random Spanish words like “acqui” and “gracias” but I really wanted to say it in Bisaya

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    1. Happens to me too when traveling to Visayan cities especially I speak chavacano.

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  14. I can relate to this especially when it's Monday in the workplace and I spoke so much tagalog during the weekend. I would talk to people at work in english but a tagalog word would slip up hahahaha! By Friday evening naman, hard to switch back to Tagalog hahahahaha

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  15. Lol, literally nobody (who matter) cares. It's a given that when english is your second language you learn it through reading books and writing papers, not through speaking it on a daily basis, thus it's normal to have an accent. What I'm guessing though, is that this is mostly inside her own head. It's prolly a bias of her that she's projecting onto others. She used to be perceived as someone who has an "upper class" accent back home, but now she's just the typical international student who has an accent. Judging by her age she's prolly with college students who are just fresh out of high school, and what they think about other people's english skills don't matter, for the most part they only get exposed to hs esl students who absolutely do not know any english before they migrated to america. Also, they may appear really confident and raise their hands all the time, but that's because being outspoken is encouraged in american schools. I don't see them openly looking down on non-native speakers, especially in new york. She's at that age na she thinks everybody is watching her every move and judging her, kaya siguro she feels like she's not being taken seriously when in fact people are just doing their own thing. You can tell, she has the tendency to write all these long rants into a void (twitter), as if she doesn't have anybody to talk to in real life about these things (which if you are in new york, is most likely the case. Isolation is pretty common even if it's a crowded city).

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    1. Millennial problems too shallow

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    2. Agree mamsh! Sana mabasa nya tong nobela mo hihi

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    3. I think you cared so much. You typed more than 100 words to express how you feel about it. Lol.

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    4. Galing ng analysis

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    5. Yes! And I noticed the long rants too.

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    6. I love this!

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    7. from new york here, and yes you’re right

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    8. 8:47 magbasa muna ng mabuti bago magreact. Na misunderstand mo yung post.

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    9. 144 true. Ganyan nman kasi sa ibang bansa they are more outspoken at naiintimidate lang cgro sya kasi iba sa nakalakhan nya. Welcome to the real world Kakie.

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  16. Lol. I feel her. I never realized that I sucked in tagalog till i moved to the u.s. i started hanging out with filipinos at church and most them are tagalog people. My in law told me my tagalog has improved a lot...born and raised in cebu #bisdak

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    1. Relate!!!! English is easier and more convenient than speaking in Tagalog. The more I force myself to speak/respond in tagalog when speaking to fellow pinoys, the more irritated I feel kasi mahirap magcommunicate. #Bisayaproblems

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  17. Parang ang gulo nya magsalita??

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  18. Engaging in discourse using English should have been part of her educational training if she went to a private school.

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  19. Dito sa US...they don't care about your accent basta naintindihan ka nang kausap mo ok na yun.

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  20. Iba kasi ang american ebglish from filipino english..when i went home i hear a lot of pa social englishero’t englisherang pinoys from exclusive viagrd in makati matatawa ka na lang sa kanila! Trying hard ang dating..sorry di pa rin anerican english! Kaya yang si frankie nahihirapan mag adjust! But give her a year or two iba na yan magsalita baka new york accent pa! Lol!

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    1. Yes true. Napansin ko din yan nung umuwi ako.

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  21. Tbh Hindi ko minsan maintindihan pag magsalita xa ng English. Masyado mabilis and Hindi American accent which was weird kc sosyalin na schools xa galing.

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  22. She’s a bilingual, whats her other language. It’s the environment she grew up in Pinas of course she gets Pinoy accent. My daughter speaks 3 languages English thai Chinese but her Tagalog is awful but she understands . She was born here educated in IS it’s the environment even though I speak Tagalog to her

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  23. Why can’t she just converse straight in English? Hindi ba nya kaya? Just asking.

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  24. Chos,ito lang ang problema niya?!? Big deal.Teh madaming problema sa Pilipinas.Maliit na bagay yan.

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  25. Ewww, so pretentious. I agree that pinoy from Tagalog region have really thick accent when speaking English, but on speaking Tagalog - she is a pinay from Manila . Lol. Sobrang ek ek na yan.

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  26. She is full of herself as always.

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  27. hiyang hiya naman sayo yung mga batang ni minsan sa buhay nila ni hindi pa nakatakim ng kanin. laki ng problema ni ate lol

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  28. Kids from exclusive schools in Manila speak Taglish. It's just the norm and it's quite challenging getting out of that habit, at least conversationally. But didn't she have proper classes in Literature where Taglish wasn't acceptable? Which school did she even go to?? Also, yes, shallow privileged teen problems. That's a supposedly 'woke' child of a infantile movie star and politician for you.

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  29. Mema lang din.. girl mas madami issue sa mundo ngayon. And yes sa NY din ako and I also say some words in Filipino and my co- workers doesn't care! So you know no one cares !

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  30. I'm currently struggling with that problem right now. I know english, filipino and waray. Now I have to learn to communicate in bisaya which messes up my brain, my tongue and my confidence😫

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  31. Twitter is mostly for ranting. That’s what she did. Let her be. Tss

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  32. Poor little rich girl's problems, so minuscule compared to the rest of us who have real big problems. This is the downside of speaking English as the primary language growing up. Taglish is so sosyal back home, but not in other countries. You can be singled out as the one who talks funny with an accent but it will improve after a few years of living in a foreign land & adapting their way of language.

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    1. Yessss tingin ko rin dahil sa pagtataglish to

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  33. It is not just her accent is the problem, also her diction. It will take several years of living in the US to learn it. Unfortunately, even English “speaker” in PH will still have an accent compared to native English speaker.

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    1. Yes. Feeling ng mga taga at galing Pilipinas American Accent na sila. Nope. Native american speakers will catch the diction. Lol.

      Ako naman ang problema ko. Hindi ako expert sa English pero sabi ng mister ko. Weird na ang grammar ko sa tagalog. So ngayon i try my best to be conscious. Haha!

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    2. As long as you communicate and understand each other, I can't see any problem

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  34. I read in one of Sidney Sheldon books that if a person speaks English with a different accent, ibig sabihin, that person can speak another language apart from English. if a person only recognized one accent, it means to say he/she has never gone out from where he/she lives or hindi pa nakapag travel abroad o di pa talaga naka encounter ng foreigner.

    Mas importante cguro if we focus on our grammar or how to use punctuations, phrases or proper sentence be it in English or Filipino. I’m also struggling on this but I welcome corrections to improve my writing or verbal skills in both languages.

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  35. phil. senator si itay, pero di ka matatas magtagalog, ineng?

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  36. almost everyone in nyc speaks with an accent. dont be hard on yourself.

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  37. You’re in New York so no one cares. The most important is to be kind, which includes being thoughtful about the words you use be it english, pinoy, taglish, cono speak. Oh and go ask your dad, he was very good at speaking - english, pinoy, taglish, conostic when we were in U.P. He was very easy going and made people around him comfortable too. Don’t ask your mom, iba strength nya, showbiz.

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  38. Taglish kase Nanay nya hahaha dear heart ps i love you, ganyan si sharon magsalita lols namana ata nya.

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  39. Given time her tongue will adjust. Why the hurry? Of course you have the accent you are pinoy and was born there even if you speak fluently in English. I wonder what's her next rants. She's becoming so full of herself lately. Americans don't particularly care about any accent especially in NYC. Having an accent can be a plus. She's just a little too concerned and it's unnecessary.

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  40. Some people commenting here need to be schooled in kindness. That’s Frankie’s struggle, why are you diminishing it just because you think that you or anyone else has it worse than her? We all lead different lives, feel different things, and struggle with different things.

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  41. The problem is they converse in Taglish in the Philippines. If she wants to improve her conversation/communication skills, she should learn how to speak with one Language. Speak in Tagalog/Filipino when talking to native tongue Filipino people and English to non Tagalog speakers.

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